Category Archives: annotation

Annotating Nineteenth Century American Foods

Today I decided to annotate Aunt Chloe’s “tea rusks” and the “seed-cake” with which someone is often plying little Harry. And I stumbled across this wonderful digital repository of nineteenth-century cookbooks, Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project, which is … Continue reading

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“The worst use you can put a man to is to hang him.” Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

As far as I know (and I’ve checked several editions, including Diller’s Broadview; the two Nortons, Ammons’ and Gates-Robbins’, and the two Oxfords, Sklar’s and Hedrick’s–the five most extensively annotated editions), no editor of Uncle Tom’s Cabin has identified the … Continue reading

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On Scholarly Annotation

This blog post will be discursive, as it is of the open notebook sort and will review the literature while in the process (hopefully) of clarifying my own thought. The literature on scholarly annotation is not particularly extensive, but a … Continue reading

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Black Sam’s “Evident and Eminent”: Stowe’s Theological Joke or a Typo?

In the National Era, when Haley seeks to catch Eliza and her child Harry, Sam boasts to Andy in Haley’s hearing–after the ludicrous episode with the beech nut and Haley’s horse–about his expectation for the “evident and imminent success of … Continue reading

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Uncle Tom’s Cabin Variant: Mr. Wilson as a “reasoner” and the Logicians

In Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Mr. Wilson is the owner of the bagging factory in which George Harris works. After George escapes, he encounters Mr. Wilson in a tavern, where ensues an argument in which Mr. Wilson tries to convince … Continue reading

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